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donald trump age and birthday
donald trump age and birthday
.tptn_list_count {display:none;}   A-to-Z List Who Was Born on My Birthday? Born on My Birthday Born Today Browse by… Birthday Birth Place Birth Year Zodiac Occupation Cause of Death Date of Death Year of Death Age of Death Lists home page, or look at our list of famous disappearing acts. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z The Conversation.] Joshua F.J. Inwood, Penn State University 2017 was a year of increased conflict in the United States. Many diverse communities were forced to confront a range of challenges related to anti-Semitism, racism, homophobia and anti-immigrant feelings. These challenges strike at the heart of what it means to live in a multicultural, democratic society. Yet, it is not the first time America has faced such a crisis – this divisiveness has a much longer history. I study the civil rights movement and the field of peace geographies. We faced similar crises related to the broader civil rights struggles in the 1960s. So, what can we draw from the past that is relevant to the present? Specifically, how can we heal a nation that is divided along race, class and political lines? As outlined by , the role of love, in engaging individuals and communities in conflict, is crucial today. For King, love was not sentimental. It demanded that individuals tell their oppressors what they were doing was wrong. King spent his public career working toward ending segregation and fighting racial discrimination. For many people the pinnacle of this work occurred in Washington, D.C., when he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. Less well-known and often ignored is his later work on ending poverty and his fight on behalf of poor people. In fact, when King was assassinated in Memphis he was in the midst of building toward a national march on Washington, D.C., that would have brought together tens of thousands of economically disenfranchised people to advocate for policies that would reduce poverty. This effort – known as the “Poor People’s Campaign” – aimed to dramatically shift national priorities to the health and welfare of working peoples. Scholars such as Derek Alderman, Paul Kingsbury and Owen Dwyer have emphasized how King’s work can be applied in today’s context. They argue that calling attention to the civil rights movement, can “change the way students understand themselves in relation to the larger project of civil rights.” And in understanding the civil rights movement, students and the broader public can see its contemporary significance. King focused on the role of love as key to building healthy communities and the ways in which love can and should be at the center of our social interactions. King’s final book, “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?,” published in the year before his assassination, provides us with his most expansive vision of an inclusive, diverse and economically equitable U.S. nation. For King, love is a key part of creating communities that work for everyone and not just the few at the expense of the many. Love was not a mushy or easily dismissed emotion, but was central to the kind of community he envisioned. King made distinctions between three forms of love which are key to the human experience: “eros,” “philia” and most importantly “agape.” For King, eros is a form of love that is most closely associated with desire, while philia is often the love that is experienced between very good friends or family. These visions are different from agape. Agape, which was at the center of the movement he was building, was the moral imperative to engage with one’s oppressor in a way that showed the oppressor the ways their actions dehumanize and detract from society. He said, King further defined agape when he argued at the University of California at Berkeley that the concept of agape “stands at the center of the movement we are to carry on in the Southland.” It was a love that demanded that one stand up for oneself and tells those who oppress that what they were doing was wrong. In the face of violence directed at minority communities and in a deepening political divisions in the country, King’s words and philosophy are perhaps more critical for us today than at any point in the recent past. As King noted, all persons exist in an interrelated community and all are dependent on each other. By connecting love to community, King argued there were opportunities to build a more just and economically sustainable society which respected difference. As he said, King outlined a vision in which we are compelled to work toward making our communities inclusive. They reflect the broad values of equality and democracy. Through an engagement with one another as its foundation, agape provides opportunities to work toward common goals. At a time when the nation feels so divided, there is a need to bring back King’s vision of agape-fueled community building and begin a difficult conversation about where we are as a nation and where we want to go. It would move us past simply seeing the other side as being wholly motivated by hate. Engaging in a conversation through agape signals a willingness to restore broken communities and to approach difference with an open mind. Interested in Black history? Check out our . [post_title] => Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Vision of Love Still Matters [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-martin-luther-king-jr-s-vision-of-love-still-matters [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-13 11:52:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-13 16:52:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92462 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 92398 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2018-01-07 09:59:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-07 14:59:21 [post_content] => John Young, the "astronaut's astronaut" who flew on six different NASA missions over 18 years, has died at age 87. Complications from pneumonia was the cause of death. With apologies to actor Jerry Van Dyke, we are declaring John Young the first major death of 2018. But not many apologies, because the race isn't really close. [caption id="attachment_92397" align="alignnone" width="663"] Astronauts John Young (left) and Gus Grissom prepare for flight on Gemini III. The two-man capsule lifted off for five hours in space on March 23, 1965.[/caption] John Young may not have had the fame of "firsties" like Neil Armstrong or Sally Ride, but in his way he had the most distinguished career of any astronaut in NASA's first 50 years. He flew on six different NASA missions: two in Gemini capsules, two in Apollo missions, and two on the space shuttle. He actually was a firstie himself, commanding the very first space shuttle flight into orbit in 1981. His Apollo 10 flight in May 1969 was a vital "dress rehearsal" for the Apollo 11 moon landing that followed two months later. Young flew the command module as the lunar lander actually detached and flew down into a lower orbit, then returned successfully. [caption id="attachment_92395" align="aligncenter" width="492"] John Young (center) poses with Apollo 16 command module pilot Thomas Mattingly II (left) and lunar module pilot Charles "Chuck" Duke Jr.[/caption] Three years later, John Young became the ninth man to walk on the moon when he commanded Apollo 16. That's him rat-racing the lunar rover across the moon's surface in what NASA called a "Grand Prix" run. Despite his many accomplishments, John Young is also remembered for smuggling a corned beef sandwich from Wolfie’s Delicatessen in Cocoa Beach, Florida, onto his first flight, the Gemini 3 mission with . The scamp! John Young spent his later years at NASA working on astronaut safety and risk mitigation. He finally retired from NASA in 2004, the year he turned 74, with 42 years of space work under his belt. By then he had already been named to the National Aviation Hall of Fame, among many other honors.  He published his memoirs, Forever Young, in 2013. Don't miss NASA's wonderful John Young photo gallery. There's no shot of the corned beef sandwich, but you can never have enough of those wonderful shots from space. Or see our full biography of astronaut John Young »   [post_title] => John Young is the First Big Death of 2018 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => john-young-is-the-first-big-death-of-2018 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-07 13:42:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-07 18:42:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92398 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 92305 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-12-29 21:56:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-30 02:56:40 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_63002" align="aligncenter" width="663"] Sue Grafton signs for a fan at the Los Angeles Times Festival of books in 2005. (Photo: WENN)[/caption] Now we'll never know what "Z" is for. Mystery author Sue Grafton has died of cancer at age 77. Her long-running "alphabet" series of mysteries began with in 1982, and continued right through to earlier this year. The novels featured Kinsey Millhone, her groundbreaking female detective. "A salty-mouthed, twice-divorced ex-cop with a penchant for Quarter Pounders with Cheese" is how the Los Angeles Times described Millhone in their obituary for Grafton. "The writer liked to refer to Millhone, who investigates murders and disappearances in coastal Santa Teresa, as the thinner, younger, braver version of herself, living a life she may have led had she not married and had children at a young age." Grafton's daughter, Jamie Clark, posted a message on Facebook today saying that Grafton had died last night "after a two year battle with cancer." She also addressed the rumors (or hopes, really) that Grafton had already salted away a final Z novel in the series. "As far as we in the family are concerned, the alphabet now ends at Y." Sue Grafton lived for 77 years and 248 days. That number puts her just ahead of scientist and spy and fellow author Edward Bancroft (77 years and 242 days) and just short of loathsome comedian Lucille Ball (77 years and 263 days) on the great tally sheet in the sky. A productive life, for sure. There are still a few days left in the year, but we're betting that Sue Grafton is the last big death of 2017. Happy trails, Ms. Grafton, wherever you may be. Now see our biography of Sue Grafton »     [post_title] => Sue Grafton is the Last Big Death of 2017 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sue-grafton-is-the-last-big-death-of-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-29 22:10:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-30 03:10:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92305 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 92261 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-12-23 14:07:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-23 19:07:32 [post_content] => Who was the most significant death of 2017? The year is drawing to a close, and so far 29 people have died who were famous enough to have biographies in Who2. That's down from 2016, when the number was 43 and included luminaries like Muhammad Ali, Carrie Fisher and Antonin Scalia.  Of course, 2017 still has 8 days left to go. Let's look at the five most important figures who died in 2017. This is not a ranking by wonderfulness -- it's a ranking of those 2017 decedents who had the on the world during their short stay on Earth. [caption id="attachment_92262" align="aligncenter" width="556"] Jerry Lewis in an NBC publicity photo from 1973.[/caption] 5.  . The rubber-faced and persnickety comedian had three distinct phases: as part of Martin & Lewis, his superstar comedy pairing with Dean Martin; as a stand-alone movie director and star in movies like ; and as host of the annual Muscular Dystrophy Association telethon for 45 years, during which time he raised over $2 billion for MDA. He was a huge star in the 1950s and 1960s, and while he was both loved and loathed, he made his mark. [caption id="attachment_92263" align="aligncenter" width="571"] Chuck Berry, circa 1960, in a promotional photo from Pickwick Records.[/caption] 4. . The rock-n-roll guitarist, singer and composer "defined rock & roll during its early years and for decades to come," according to Rolling Stone. His years of greatest influence lasted little more than a decade: his first hit was "Maybellene" in 1955, and he continued with hits like "Johnny B. Goode" and "Roll Over Beethoven" until he went to jail in 1962 for shenanigans with an underaged girl. He influenced The Beatles and Keith Richards and many others and remains one of rock's iconic guitarists. Chuck Berry was inducted into the Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. [caption id="attachment_92264" align="aligncenter" width="550"] Businessman David Rockefeller in 1953. (National Archives photo)[/caption] 3. . You want to talk influence? Let's talk Rockefellers. By the time he died at 101, David Rockefeller had been CEO of Chase Manhattan Bank (during which time "Chase spread internationally and became a central component of the world's financial system"), had been chums with and advisor to world leaders as disparate as Henry Kissinger and Fidel Castro, and gave away over $900 million to schools, public health and poverty eradication. Oh, and he also served as a captain in the U.S. Army during World War II. All in all, an impactful life. [caption id="attachment_91916" align="aligncenter" width="663"] A photo of Hugh Hefner in the 1960s. (Playboy photo)[/caption] 2. . Well, what can you say about the old boy? Long before he became the aged parody of himself, the geezer in the red velvet pajamas, Hugh Hefner was a canny businessman who shook up the sexual mores of America. "He was compared to Jay Gatsby, Citizen Kane and Walt Disney, but Mr. Hefner was his own production," said in its obituary. (On the other hand,  columnist called Hefner "a pornographer and chauvinist who... died a pack rat in a decaying manse where porn blared during his pathetic orgies.") Love him or hate him, Hefner's impact on sex in America (and its reverberations in related issues like birth control, abortion and women's rights) probably changed more lives than did the impact of Chuck Berry or Jerry Lewis. [caption id="attachment_91542" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Roger Ailes in a public relations photo from Fox News.[/caption] 1. Roger Ailes. "He did all the damage he could do in 77 years" should be the epitaph on Roger Ailes's tombstone. (If one exists.) With cash from billionaire Rupert Murdoch, Roger Ailes founded and nurtured Fox News, the scurrilous fear factory and propaganda machine which has so warped the political conversation in America. Ailes started out as an entertainment producer, but he went to the dark side with Richard Nixon and never looked back. (Along the way, he also became a malignant sexual predator who told one woman "If you want to play with the big boys, you have to lay with the big boys.") For the malevolent power of Fox News, for refining the art of the truth-twisting political attack ad, for setting the stage for ever more strident propagandists like Andrew Breitbart, Matt Drudge and Steve Bannon -- for all this and more, Roger Ailes was the most impactful person who died in 2017. [post_title] => The Five Biggest Deaths of 2017 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-five-biggest-deaths-of-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-23 14:19:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-23 19:19:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92261 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 92249 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-12-21 09:44:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-21 14:44:39 [post_content] => How do you keep an impatient music star in the room while you write hit songs? Try a suitcase full of Legos. That's just one of the fascinatin' facts in this truly wonderful New York Times report on how Ed Sheeran and his cohorts wrote "Shape of You," the biggest hit of 2017. It's a great song and a great story. The official video has been viewed almost three billion times, and it performs the minor miracle of making Ed Sheeran look like a handsome boxer. (At least until the comical finale.) Sheeran's co-writer  was worried that the lyric "I'm in love with your body" would seem to be objectifying women, so the boxing theme is probably no accident; it puts a clever empowering spin on the whole scenario. Well, whatever. "Shape of You" is a very catchy tune indeed. It's been on the Billboard Hot 100 for 49 weeks now and it's at 23. See our biography of Ed Sheeran » [post_title] => How Ed Sheeran Created 'Shape of You,' the Smash Song of 2017 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-ed-sheeran-created-shape-of-you-the-smash-song-of-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-21 09:45:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-21 14:45:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92249 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 92151 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-12-04 09:41:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-04 14:41:43 [post_content] => Lt. General Michael Flynn celebrates his 59th birthday sometime this month. The trick is, nobody seems to know when. [caption id="attachment_92148" align="aligncenter" width="400"] (U.S. Government photo)[/caption] Oh, presumably his  knows. But we looked pretty hard for the exact day while doing our new biography of Michael Flynn, and came up empty. You know Flynn: the retired Lieutenant General, former head of the Defense Intelligence Agency, close advisor to Donald Trump during his 2016 presidential campaign, National Security Advisor for 24 days, and now admitted felon who lied to the FBI about contacts with Russia. Yet for all that time in public life, every resource we can find online lists Michael Flynn's date of birth as "December 1958." That includes venerable sources like Biography.com, U.S. News & World Report, ABC News and even the ever-present Wikipedia. Bloomberg doesn't attempt to give his age. Even a terrific in-depth profile from his hometown paper, the , doesn't have the day. His date of birth isn't even listed in the official federal charges he pled guilty to last week, filed by super-cop Robert Mueller. Gee, if you get a they list your birthday, don't they? The Who2 birthday desk pulled out some of its oldest research tricks, including a (fruitless) exact Boolean search for "Happy birthday, Michael Flynn." (That trick is how we became one of the first sources to correctly list Malia Obama's birthday as 1998, 1999 -- as sources as far-flung as the and the had it.) Yet this is a man who spent 33 years in public government service in the U.S. Army, held many key posts, and served as National Security Advisor. (Although he was not vetted by Congress for that post.) Surely Michael Flynn's date of birth is all over government databases, and not just classified ones. To be clear, we're not suggesting a conspiracy here. Maybe as a former intelligence officer, he's just verrrry good at hiding his birthdate. But this kind of opaqueness is quite unusual.  The current National Security Advisor, , was born on July 24, 1962. Before Flynn it was Susan Rice, born November 17, 1964. Same goes for , (another former general), , and all the other NSAs of years past. Even President Trump, who won't make his taxes public, has made his birthday public. We are currently stumped, but will keep digging. We're not into Freedom of Information Act territory  yet, but it be nice to know Michael Flynn's birthday. One thing we discover was Michael Flynn's place of birth. Per the , Michael Flynn was born at Fort Meade, Maryland -- in Rhode Island, as most sources state. His father Charles served in World War II and then "remained in the Army, serving in Korea and rotating through military bases, where the Flynns brought into the world their early children, including Mike, born at Fort Meade, Maryland." They moved to Rhode Island shortly afterwards, and Flynn grew up in Middletown, not far from Newport. That's something, anyway. See our full Michael Flynn biography »     [post_title] => How Old is Michael Flynn? Nobody Knows for Sure [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-old-is-michael-flynn-nobody-knows-for-sure [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-04 09:48:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-04 14:48:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92151 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 92133 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-11-30 23:34:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-01 04:34:53 [post_content] => Jim Nabors has died at age 87 after a long career that was really known for one thing: . Nabors was 87 years and 171 days old when he died, which means he fell just short of Prime Minster Margaret Thatcher and her 87 years, 177 days. (What a comedy team they could have made!) On the plus side, he lived 20 days longer than Jonathan Winters, his fellow 1960s comedian who died at 87 years, 151 days in 2013. Jim Nabors played a goofball Marine private for five seasons on , which ran from 1964-69. (His long-suffering sergeant was played by Frank Sutton.) His birth year of 1930 meant that Nabors was 34 when he began playing a newbie private in the Marines, but no matter: the show was a big hit. went on forever in reruns, and Nabors shrewdly had a 20% cut of syndication for the show, so he was set for life. Jim Nabors was a natural baritone, and one of the running tricks of the show was having him stop with the hideous "golleee!" voice just long enough break into a moving ballad or spiritual that would make jaws drop and tears flow all around. It was an old gag, but a good one. Happy trails, Mr. Nabors, wherever you may be. See our full Jim Nabors biography » [post_title] => Jim Nabors Didn't Quite Make it to Margaret Thatcher [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => jim-nabors-didnt-quite-make-it-to-margaret-thatcher [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-01 08:00:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-01 13:00:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92133 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 92090 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-11-26 20:21:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-27 01:21:22 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_92082" align="aligncenter" width="663"] (Photo: Jill Greenberg / USA Network)[/caption] Our new Meghan Markle biography is now live -- in anticipation of her (maybe) marrying Britain's Prince Harry. They're officially engaged. ] Meghan Markle has already worn a wedding dress -- on TV, as the ambitious paralegal Rachel Zane on the USA Network show . It's been quite the hit, running for over 100 episodes since its debut in 2011. Markle has been along for the ride the whole way. Markle has also worn a wedding dress in real life: she was married to producer and movie guy Trevor Engelson from 2009 until their divorce in 2011. That was no big deal, until she started dating Prince Harry after meeting him at a dinner party in 2016. In the Royal Family, divorce has a long history of bad mojo -- from Princess Margaret's ill-fated romance with Group Captain Peter Townshend to the grandmother of them all, king-busting American divorcee Wallis Simpson. [caption id="attachment_92084" align="aligncenter" width="520"] Meghan Markle on the cover of Vanity Fair magazine in 2016.[/caption] But times change, and Meghan Markle is a pretty big star in her own right. The cover of makes anyone look good. And Harry is only fifth in line to the throne, making his choice of a mate rather less vital. The marriage of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle isn't a sure thing yet it is], but rumors are "at fever pitch." If it happens it's a win-win for everyone. Even for former husband Trevor Engelson, who is reportedly pitching a sitcom based on "a man whose wife leaves him for a British prince." See our full Meghan Markle biography » [post_title] => Meghan Markle Biography - New! [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => meghan-markle-biography-new [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-27 07:16:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-27 12:16:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92090 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 92064 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-11-22 06:11:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-22 11:11:58 [post_content] => David Cassidy has died at age 67, and if you're not old enough to weep nostalgic tears at news of his passing, you may instead be saying "Who is David Cassidy?" You can get most of the story just by watching this clip from , Cassidy's hit 1970s sitcom: The show was a triumph of suspended disbelief; if you can convince yourself that li'l tyke on the tambourine is actually playing, give yourself a shiny star. On the other hand, props to Shirley Jones, Cassidy's onscreen mom and real-life stepmom, for throwing herself into the role like a trouper. (She was a long way from Rodgers and Hammerstein.) David Cassidy actually did do the singing, though: series creator Bernard Slade and producers Paul Junger Witt and Bob Claver did not care whether Cassidy could sing, knowing only that his androgynous good looks would guarantee success. Shortly after production began, though, Cassidy convinced music producer Wes Farrell that he was good enough, and he was promoted to lead singer for the series' recordings. The show actually made Cassidy more of a pop music star than an acting star; he even sold out the Houston Astrodome in 1972.  Well, good luck to you, Mr. Cassidy, wherever you are. See our biography of David Cassidy » [post_title] => David Cassidy Sings 'I Think I Love You' [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => david-cassidy-sings-i-think-i-love-you [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-22 07:55:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-22 12:55:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92064 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 92047 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-11-19 11:09:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-19 16:09:50 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_92048" align="aligncenter" width="573"] [/caption] Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip have been married 70 years as of November 20, 2017. (Wow!)  They've just released this 70th anniversary portrait in a rather interesting setting: George III and , who were married for 57 years. Nice to see the royal family embracing crazy old George III, who deserve a little credit for staying married for so long. (More likely it's Queen Charlotte who deserves the credit.) At any rate, the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh are looking slightly more casual there than they did on their wedding day in 1947: [caption id="attachment_92049" align="aligncenter" width="1410"] [/caption] The future queen and her future husband met on a tennis court in Devonshire in 1939, according to one lively report: The old net-jumping devil! At the home of the future "Admiral Sir Frederick Dalrymple-Hamilton" -- you can't get much more British than that. Their relationship was fated from the start. The Royal Family has released 70 facts about the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh's wedding, albeit rather facts, one must admit: Good old prickly Gandhi. India had just won its independence from Britain a few months earlier, and it seems he couldn't resist rubbing the princess's nose in it. Still, the picnic basket and refrigerator surely made up for it. DevonLive has a rather more interesting list of 70 facts to mark their 70th anniversary, among them: Enemy silkworms and beloved corgis -- now we're getting somewhere! Hard to believe the beard trick ever fooled anyone, however. Not even Admiral Sir Frederick Dalrymple-Hamilton. Well, it all worked out in the end. Happy anniversary to the happy couple! See our biography of Queen Elizabeth II »         [post_title] => Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip Met on a Tennis Court Nearly 80 Years Ago [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => queen-elizabeth-and-prince-philip-met-on-a-tennis-court-nearly-80-years-ago [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-20 15:09:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-20 20:09:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92047 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 92462 [post_author] => 8 [post_date] => 2018-01-13 11:41:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-01-13 16:41:09 [post_content] => The Conversation.] Joshua F.J. Inwood, Penn State University 2017 was a year of increased conflict in the United States. Many diverse communities were forced to confront a range of challenges related to anti-Semitism, racism, homophobia and anti-immigrant feelings. These challenges strike at the heart of what it means to live in a multicultural, democratic society. Yet, it is not the first time America has faced such a crisis – this divisiveness has a much longer history. I study the civil rights movement and the field of peace geographies. We faced similar crises related to the broader civil rights struggles in the 1960s. So, what can we draw from the past that is relevant to the present? Specifically, how can we heal a nation that is divided along race, class and political lines? As outlined by , the role of love, in engaging individuals and communities in conflict, is crucial today. For King, love was not sentimental. It demanded that individuals tell their oppressors what they were doing was wrong. King spent his public career working toward ending segregation and fighting racial discrimination. For many people the pinnacle of this work occurred in Washington, D.C., when he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. Less well-known and often ignored is his later work on ending poverty and his fight on behalf of poor people. In fact, when King was assassinated in Memphis he was in the midst of building toward a national march on Washington, D.C., that would have brought together tens of thousands of economically disenfranchised people to advocate for policies that would reduce poverty. This effort – known as the “Poor People’s Campaign” – aimed to dramatically shift national priorities to the health and welfare of working peoples. Scholars such as Derek Alderman, Paul Kingsbury and Owen Dwyer have emphasized how King’s work can be applied in today’s context. They argue that calling attention to the civil rights movement, can “change the way students understand themselves in relation to the larger project of civil rights.” And in understanding the civil rights movement, students and the broader public can see its contemporary significance. King focused on the role of love as key to building healthy communities and the ways in which love can and should be at the center of our social interactions. King’s final book, “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?,” published in the year before his assassination, provides us with his most expansive vision of an inclusive, diverse and economically equitable U.S. nation. For King, love is a key part of creating communities that work for everyone and not just the few at the expense of the many. Love was not a mushy or easily dismissed emotion, but was central to the kind of community he envisioned. King made distinctions between three forms of love which are key to the human experience: “eros,” “philia” and most importantly “agape.” For King, eros is a form of love that is most closely associated with desire, while philia is often the love that is experienced between very good friends or family. These visions are different from agape. Agape, which was at the center of the movement he was building, was the moral imperative to engage with one’s oppressor in a way that showed the oppressor the ways their actions dehumanize and detract from society. He said, King further defined agape when he argued at the University of California at Berkeley that the concept of agape “stands at the center of the movement we are to carry on in the Southland.” It was a love that demanded that one stand up for oneself and tells those who oppress that what they were doing was wrong. In the face of violence directed at minority communities and in a deepening political divisions in the country, King’s words and philosophy are perhaps more critical for us today than at any point in the recent past. As King noted, all persons exist in an interrelated community and all are dependent on each other. By connecting love to community, King argued there were opportunities to build a more just and economically sustainable society which respected difference. As he said, King outlined a vision in which we are compelled to work toward making our communities inclusive. They reflect the broad values of equality and democracy. Through an engagement with one another as its foundation, agape provides opportunities to work toward common goals. At a time when the nation feels so divided, there is a need to bring back King’s vision of agape-fueled community building and begin a difficult conversation about where we are as a nation and where we want to go. It would move us past simply seeing the other side as being wholly motivated by hate. Engaging in a conversation through agape signals a willingness to restore broken communities and to approach difference with an open mind. Interested in Black history? Check out our . [post_title] => Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Vision of Love Still Matters [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-martin-luther-king-jr-s-vision-of-love-still-matters [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-01-13 11:52:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-01-13 16:52:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.who2.com/?p=92462 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 3861 [max_num_pages] => 387 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => 1 [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 30c2e6be9edd47177c2ecde2a38bbfc7 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Vision of Love Still Matters John Young is the First Big Death of 2018 Sue Grafton is the Last Big Death of 2017 January 2018 December 2017 November 2017 October 2017 September 2017 August 2017 July 2017 June 2017 May 2017 April 2017 March 2017 February 2017 January 2017 December 2016 November 2016 October 2016 September 2016 August 2016 July 2016 June 2016 May 2016 April 2016 March 2016 February 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 February 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011 December 2010 November 2010 October 2010 September 2010 August 2010 July 2010 June 2010 May 2010 April 2010 March 2010 February 2010 January 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 July 2009 June 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 July 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April 2008 March 2008 February 2008 January 2008 December 2007 November 2007 October 2007 September 2007 August 2007 July 2007 June 2007 May 2007 April 2007 March 2007 February 2007 January 2007 December 2006 November 2006 October 2006 September 2006 August 2006 July 2006 June 2006 May 2006 April 2006 March 2006 January 2006 December 2005 November 2005 October 2005 September 2005 The Movies Barack Obama Celebrity Deaths Hooray for Hollywood! 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